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Monday, 5 September 2011

The Belly Of The Beast

Hi, All.


It occurred to me that given the sheer size of HMSW Gargantua, much of the time when playing games or taking photographs from a model's-eye point-of-view, I would be looking up at her. And I had so far done nothing regarding the detailing of her underside.

This had to remedied, and quick-sharpish, Sir!

So, in a rush of enthusiasm, I attacked the problem from underneath. Just as any self-respecting Englishman always does.

Fortunately, I still haven't glued-on the engine, so I was able to remove this, flip the model upside-down and balance it on its wine glass.

Step One was to outline the underbelly. Adding raised strips to surround an area, and then rivets, you can very quickly achieve an impression of bulk.

(click pics to enlarge)

Above, left: The plain, unadorned belly. Above, right: Plastic strips create a frame. Below, left: An ugly gap at the front of the model is filled with Green Stuff. Below, right: Positions are marked for where the pistons will emerge.

Next, using the walker's uncompleted legs as a guide, I marked where recesses needed to be. These will eventually form the openings for huge pistons that will protrude from the body to drive the legs. These, too, were outlined, framed, rivetted, etc.

Left: Piston recesses are framed. Right: Panels are gradually added.

Once the recesses were in place, panels were added in the gaps. Again, the aim here was to create a feeling of bulk. I also decided to add a linear feature along the length of the model. This took the form of a strip of corrugated plastic, over (under?) which pipes were suspended. These may prove to be vulnerable in battle, but who cares? They look good!

Pipes, hatches and 191 rivets complete the detail.

While working on all of this, I was also adding detail to the underside of the head - but more on that later. (It's not finished, painted and pretty yet!)

The pipes as viewed from the sides. (And upside-down, of course!)

Finally, after a total of 191 rivets were added, the underbelly was painted.

The final painted product, ready for pistons and legs!

Rivet count so far: 2,337!

Not bad for a few hours' work. Time for some grub and a glass or six of port, methinks!

All The Best!



11 comments:

  1. Only a true perfectionist would invest so much time and attention to detail on the bits that no one, except the little metal men can see.

    I salute you Sir. Rule Britannia!

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  2. Thank you, Sir! I'd salute back but I think I just glued me 'ands together!

    Huzzah!

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  3. Incredable detail. Very well done and top marks to the Colonel.

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  4. Thank you, Rodger!

    Still have to do the head, back door, legs, window panes, navigational equipment, ladder to the rear deck, handrail, 3 gatling guns, feet, drive pistons, coal, flags and a partridge in a pear tree...

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  5. You can't go wrong with rivets an' pipes, say I. Honestly, your model is so good, I'll have to up me own bloomin' game (mutter mumble grumble...) ;)

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  6. What? What's that? For Goodness sake, speak up man!

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  7. A continuance of fine craftsmanship in the best of British tradition. Looking forward to seeing more.

    Well done Colonel

    @AJ, pity the rest of us poor buggers who have to face this thing on the table top, and come up with something equally exceptional! Eek!! ;-)

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  8. Thank you, Smillie! Keep watchin' - it's going to get rather awesomer.

    Scott - Please don't come up with an equally exceptional contraption, or I'll have to do another, and then you will, and then... and then... Do we really want an arms race???

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  9. Arms race? Hmm, I'm getting visions of a Steampunk BOLO-style Continental Siege Unit. Where's the nurse? I think it's time for me medication...

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  10. I rather think it's past that time, Old Thing! Just keep thinking happy thoughts.

    Jellybabies!

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